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A Beautiful Success(아름다운 성공)/ Genesis 45:1-15(창45:1-15)/ 2006-11-20
A Beautiful Success(아름다운 성공) Genesis 45:1-15(창45:1-15) A BEAUTIFUL SUCCESS Genesis 45: 1-15 An extremely popular MBC television series in Korea, called “Success Era,” concluded this past season with an episode about professional woman golfer Se-ri Pak as the grand finale. This program was started in November of 1997—in the midst of the great Asian financial crisis that led to IMF bailout in Korea—to give a sense of hope and courage to the despairing and dejected people of Korea. As its pilot episode, “Success Era” featured stories about late Ju Young Chung, CEO of Hyundai Group, and Ja Kyung Ku, the Honorary CEO of LG Korea to give inspiration to the masses that were reeling from the effect of a massive financial crisis. As featured subjects in “Success Era,” 198 people from all strata of society, who have shown particular distinction and renown in succeeding in life, were selected. These 198 people shared a common theme throughout their lives: Their lives had been pocked marked with and scarred by countless obstacles, tribulations, or tragedies. Insufficient scholastic background, physical disabilities, poverty, discrimination against women—all these were some of the obstacles that these people had to overcome in order to succeed in life. The personality with the highest viewer rating—a rating of 28.7% prime time—was fashion designer Andre Kim. During a fan poll, that asked viewers which inspirational personality they would like to see again, late Hyundai CEO Ju Young Chung took first place. Noted celebrities and personalities, such as actor Sung Ki Ahn, Chancellor of Korea University Joon Yup Choi, and CEO of Nongshim Foods Choon Ho Shin, did not appear on this program because they refused to acknowledge the fact that their life story was one of success. The desire to succeed—perhaps it is one the basic instincts inherent in all human beings. Nowhere in this world can we find someone who is willing to fail. Yet, there are remarkable differences in opinion regarding the definition of success. What constitutes success? An entrepreneur will tell you that success is defined as greatest net profit. An entertainer will tell you that success is defined as garnering as much fan support and love as possible, while maintaining a sky-high popularity rating. An athlete will tell you that winning games—and ultimately championships—is the essence of success. A studious student will tell you that success is believed to be gaining admission to a college or university of his choice and graduating with a good grade. And a pastor will tell you that success is construed as having the highest possible ABC rating—Attendance, Building, as in having a sizable infrastructure to conduct service, and Cash, as in the amount of offerings made by the congregation. However, are these externally visible gauges the only true indicators of success? In this world, there are accomplishments that we, as humans, may consider to be successes while God Himself may hold contrary views. There are dishonorable, filthy successes. There are tainted successes that not only destroy those in pursuit, but also negatively impact those around them. A representative case of a filthy success may be an election victory in a political campaign, where mudslinging, illegal shortcuts, defamation, and slandering played a crucial role in victory. Around us, there are too many people who are willing to resort to any means available, regardless of ethics or morals—thus lending a true credence to the phrase “end justifies the means”—in pursuit of this scarred glory, the deplorable and dishonorable success. First place does not necessarily equate to success. There is only one first place; hence, as logic concludes, only one person who can claim to be the best—erstwhile countless number of people may have strove and gave their all to be the best. Do we count the one in the first place as the only one that succeeded while we discount everyone else as failures? Being the best—and holding the distinction as being in the first place, however, is not eternal. No matter how high a peak we may have conquered to be the number one, at some point in the near future, we must vacate that apex—for someone else will always succeed over and surpass us. Like a mountain climber who conquered a mountain peak, we must come down from the apex some point in our lives; hence, first place and the top place are not eternal. Likewise, we cannot consider ourselves to be successful on the account of money, power, or fame. Because true happiness is not a result of some contest, an item subject to grade. Because true happiness is not determined by money, power, or fame. Therefore, our success must be a thing of beauty, an item of cleanliness instead of something that is tainted and contaminated with impurities. Then what is a pure, beautiful success? What is a true success for us, as Christians? In finding an answer to this question, I would like to research into the success story of Joseph. The legendary story of Joseph’s success is a true, shining example of a pure, beautiful success. First, a beautiful success is a success that realizes God’s will and intent. Joseph was a man sacrificed due to his brothers’ envy and jealousy. As the last born, he was a subject of his father’s preferential and spoiling treatment; furthermore, overt boasting of his dreams brought on great hatred from his older brothers. Joseph was eventually sold to Egypt as a slave—and the tribulations and pains felt by Joseph during slavery is indescribable and inexpressible. In a foreign country, he had to crawl from the bottom. Joseph became the overseer of the estate of General Potiphar; however, by resisting the sexual advances of Potiphar’s wife, Joseph was imprisoned. All of you probably know, quite well, how Joseph overcame all these obstacles and tribulations in becoming the second highest ranking man in Egypt, behind the Pharaoh, as the prime minister of Egypt, the overseer of all national affairs—and the ruler of all but the one. The important thing to remember is that Joseph interprets and construes all his success in the land of Egypt as a success that will realize God’s will and intent. Joseph clearly delineates this fact when meeting with his brothers after his travails in Egypt—his brothers, whom, out of their hatred, tried to kill Joseph and eventually exiled him to a foreign land, away from the protective umbrella of his parents. Take a look at verses 5 through 8 of today’s scripture. “But now, do not therefore be grieved or angry with yourselves because you sold me here; for God sent me before you to preserve life. For these two years the famine has been in the land, and there are still five years in which there will be neither plowing nor harvesting. And God sent me before you to preserve posterity for you in the earth, and to save your lives by a great deliverance. So now it was not you who sent me here, but God; and He has made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house, and a ruler throughout all the land of Egypt.” The reason for the beauty and effervescence of Joseph’s success lies in his belief that the course of his life is a result—or providence—of realizing the holy will and script of God. Everyone—do you wish your success to be the bright, shining and beautiful success? Then ask of God’s intent towards you—about what He has in mind for you. No matter what you do—whether you earn money, go to work, study, or anything else, grab and hold onto God’s intent, of what He is trying to accomplish through you. In Matthew 6, verse 33, Jesus promised, “But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you.” If our lives are engulfed in the divine task of realizing God’s will, this alone will be enough to make our lives a success. An owner of a tennis club was cleaning up the locker room by picking up used towels after a group of high school students used his club to work out. The owner cleaned the locker room, putting all towels in a basket, without much thought and out of habit; yet, his friend, who had been watching all along, asked a very profound and meaningful question. “Did you pick up the towels because you are the owner of this club, or are you a owner of this club because you pick up the towels?” Indeed this is an important question, for it delves in the very essence of our being, our existence in this world. Why do you do the work or things that you do? Do you do it because you have no choice—that the responsibility had been thrust upon you without a choice, and you have nothing but the option of carrying out your responsibilities? Or do you do it because you consider it a divine purpose—something that God has charged you to do and accomplish? Depending on how you answer this question, your success could either be crystalline or filthy. Second, the price of beautiful success usually entails efforts wrought with sweat, tears, and blood. In Korean, the word for gangs—a group of people who resort to violence as a way of living—is “Bulhandang.” The root of the word, derived from Chinese, has a deep meaning. The word “Bulhandang” means those who desire to make a living without shedding a droplet of sweat—in other words, those who wish to live without working or exerting efforts. Disciple Paul warned the people of Thessalonia by saying, “If anyone will not work, neither shall he eat.” (Thessalonians 3 :10). A filthy, decrepit success is one in which no sweat has been expended—in essence, a cheap accomplishment without a concerted effort. Why is lottery or gambling bad? Both aim at receiving a jackpot that does not require any effort or hard work. Joseph, after shedding all three liquids that humans can produce—sweat, tears, and blood—while exerting maximum effort, rose to the second highest position in Egypt. His accomplishment was not some jackpot, a thing of luck that did not require any work or effort. In order to realize his dream, Joseph had to work hard, often suffering great pain, in a foreign land. He had to fight through insufferable loneliness, the sudden, abrupt separation from his loved family, and had to start from the bottom in a foreign land that refused to recognize his status. But he trudged along, driving forth with a firm belief that one day, God will realize his dreams—and began constructing his life. Everywhere he went, he was recognized and lauded for his characteristic—honesty and diligence. In verse 5, chapter 39 of Genesis, the Bible states that once Joseph became the overseer of the estate that belonged to the captain of the guards of the Pharaoh, Potiphar, “the Lord blessed the Egyptian’s house for Joseph’s sake; and the blessing of the Lord was on all that he had in the house and in the field.” A diligence of one man brought unprecedented abundance and blessings for the entire household. Potiphar trusted Joseph so much that he left all affairs of the estate—minus what he himself ate for meals—up to Joseph. In Genesis, chapter 41, verse 38, it is stated that once Joseph started working under the Pharaoh, he earned such a trust from the Pharaoh that Pharaoh himself boasts to other servants, “Can we find such a one as this, a man in whom is the Spirit of God?” The secret to Joseph’s success was doing his best at all he did while having faith and trust in God. Joseph’s success is beautiful because it was gained through an investment of honest effort and hard work. True mountain climbers, those who truly know and appreciate the mountain, do not call their work “mountain climbing.” Rather, they refer to it as “mountain entering.” It is not mountain climbing—a competitive activity to climb higher and higher peaks, to determine who is the best—but a mountain entering, where one enters the mountain with humblest of hearts to enjoy what the nature has to offer. It is true. In order to enter the mountain, one must become small and low; likewise, in order to achieve a beautiful success, one must lower himself to the lowest position possible. Sir Roy Sission of England stated that the secret to success lay in the ‘Three Hs of Leadership.” The impetuses of success are humanity, humility, and humor. Joseph probably embodied all three characteristics; no doubt he was a humane man full of humility and a good sense of humor. The reason why the success story of Joseph shine so brightly and referred to it often is that relying on candor and commitment as his watchword, without the safety net of his loved parents and family, Joseph created something out of nothing. There is a beautiful story behind the creation of marathon, the event often referred to as “the flower” of the Olympic Games. A Greek soldier, in 490 BC, ran 26 miles, from the city of Marathon to Athens, in order to deliver the news of Athens’s triumph over Persia during the Battle of Marathon. This soldier, upon arriving in Athens, uttered one word—Victory!—before collapsing and dying of fatigue. When the Olympic Games were revived in 1896 in the West, a new event, a 26-mile running event called marathon was created to commemorate this soldier and his beautiful commitment. In order to carry out the task of delivering the news of victory to Athens, this soldier ran and ran for 26 miles, eventually giving his own life to accomplish the task. The sweat, tears and blood shed by those who gave their all to accomplish a task are objects of beauty. If you truly desire to succeed, sweat profusely. Always remember that beautiful success is realized after a hard day’s work—through great efforts and, sometimes, pain. Third, beautiful success always benefits and brings happiness to all those around them. A special characteristic of a beautiful success is that it always ends in a happy ending. Today’s scripture captures the reunion between Joseph, who accomplished a rare, extraordinary success in Egypt, and his older brothers, who brought such extraordinary pain and suffering to bear upon Joseph. Any other person, no matter that these people were his brothers—and with the exception of Benjamin, all were his step or half brothers—would have tried to exact some sort of revenges as a pay back for all those years of suffering and pain. But Joseph did not exact revenge nor held a grudge against his brothers. He did not repay evil with evil, going eye for an eye. Rather, he forgave, and responded to evil with good and kindness. After excusing all the servants and assistants, Joseph wept aloud—so loud that the Pharaoh in Egypt heard it—in front of his brothers. In verse 14, it is stated that he wept while hugging Benjamin—the sole full sibling of Joseph, meaning they had the same mother—and Benjamin did the same in hugging him back and crying. Joseph, in hugging and kissing each and every one of his brothers, cast away all blaming and grudging feelings from his heart. They reconciled dramatically. Through all this we can gain a sense of the warm humanity of Joseph. Not only did Joseph forgive his brothers, but he also interprets his exile to Egypt as God’s divine will and blessing, to rescue and save his people—the people who were on the verge of death from starvation and famine. Joseph had the faith that his success ended not merely in his own abundance and riches, but that his success hinged upon realization of God’s plan to bring happiness and salvation to all people around him. A beautiful success enables my success to benefit others. Therefore, a tarred success is one in which money, power and fame bring happiness and benefits to a select few and not to all people. The true discriminator of a beautiful and a filthy success rests here. How many people will benefit and be happy as a result of my success? Juxtaposed against this standard, our success can be beautiful, or it can be filthy and tarred. During this year’s World Series, the Arizona Diamondbacks defeated the New York Yankees and won the World Championship. The Diamondbacks attract our particular interest because they have a 22-year old Korean relief pitcher, Byung Hyun Kim. Kim became a subject of attention—as the possible goat should the Diamondbacks lose the series—after blowing a 2-run lead in the bottom of ninth inning with two outs—in both Games 4 and 5. However, since the Diamondbacks dramatically won Game 7, Kim’s mistakes were covered up and disappeared among the euphoria of Arizona victory. The interesting thing to note is that despite the two crushing, demoralizing defeats, no one on the Diamondbacks criticized Kim for losing two-run leads on two consecutive nights. Rather, they encouraged Kim by saying “losing is not your fault but our collective faults,” and “we believe in you.” Furthermore, even the Arizona fans cheered Kim on during Game 6, chanting “We want Kim!” and “We’ll be OK with Kim!” from the stands. After Game 7 Arizona victory, Kim had the following things to say to the reporters who interviewed him. “All this time, I played baseball by myself. Because I was a pitcher, the sense of self was more acute on the field because the game hinged upon the pitches that I made. I though all was well if I pitched well. But through this Series, I learned that my teammates are my family. We win as a team and we lose as a team.” Byung Hyun Kim finally understood the essence of team sports through the World Series. In Luke 6, verse 38, Jesus said that “Give, and it will be given to you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, and running over will be put into you bosom. For with the same measure that you use, it will be measured back to you.” We are all neighbors, living together and next to each other. The true success can be defined as those accomplishments that not only benefit myself, but one that benefits the collective community and those around us. What is the wrong with those children who learn to think that the first place is the only definition of success? Such notion, when analyzed carefully, is a very selfish, self-serving one. By being in the first place, those children learn to benefit only themselves and seek to be the best for their own sake and happiness. A success that provides something for the neighbors, benefits others, and brings happiness to all people around us is a truly beautiful success. No matter what area you succeed in, I hope that your success can bring happiness and benefits to all those around you. Lastly, let’s think about Jesus with Joseph’s success story. By the secular standards, Jesus Christ was not a success. Everyone strives to be the number one in this world; however, Jesus finished last and became a failure. His Disciples, of whom He had great expectations, did not meet nor measured up to what Jesus expected of them; furthermore, they failed to understand Jesus’ true intent. Jesus was arrested, tortured, interrogated, and executed at the cross in the most vile, decrepit manner. In sum, He failed greatly. Did anyone fail so completely, by the world’s standards, in history of mankind? Yet, strangely, history does not view Jesus as a failure. Rather, the history views Jesus as its brightest, greatest, and most successful victor ever. Why so? It is because Jesus Himself demonstrated and carried out the three standards, the prerequisites, of beautiful success that I have mentioned above. Jesus was but a tool of God in carrying out the Herculean task of saving mankind. In order to carry out this task, and to realize God’s will, Jesus unsparingly shed His sweat, tears, and blood. He let His body be crucified on the cross and torn apart to meet God’s intent. Not only did Jesus meet God’s intent in saving mankind, he brought true happiness and benefits to all mankind, near and far, throughout the epoch of history. Do you want to see a demonstration of a beautiful success? Think of Joseph and Jesus. I pray in the name of our Lord that your successes will be beautiful, ones that benefit all your neighbors just as Joseph and Jesus’ success brought happiness and benefits to all mankind. I would like to conclude today’s sermon by sharing with you an excerpt from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s work. “To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and ensure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to leave the world a better place whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.” Pastor H. K. Kim
A Blessed Alternative(복된 선택)/ Revelation 21:4(계21:4)/ 2012-03-23
A Blessed Alternative(복된 선택) Revelation 21:4(계21:4) There shall be no more death, nor sorrow, nor crying. - Revelation 21:4 “다시 사망이 없고 애통하는 것이나 곡하는 것이…다시 있지 아니하리니” - 요한계시록 21:4 Imagine that a person was seriously ill and near death but then recovered. Recalling his experience, he says that recovering from the surgery that saved his life was extremely painful. But then he jokingly remarks, “Think of the alternative!” Even Christians sometimes say that. Yet what does that common jest imply? Is it better to endure the pain of this temporal world than to die and enter the eternal joys of heaven? We know that life in the coming world will be so much better than the life we now experience in this world. According to the apostle Paul, “To live is Christ, and to die is gain ... To depart and be with Christ ... is far better” (Philippians 1:21,23). Certainly we are thankful for material blessings and provisions from the Lord and all the meaningful relationships we experience here and now by His grace. But as Christians, let’s not even jokingly agree that the option of entering heaven is less desirable than surviving on this sin-cursed earth. We eagerly anticipate the joy of being with our Lord Jesus Christ in heaven (2 Corinthians 5:8). Someday “there shall be no more death, nor sorrow, nor crying. There shall be no more pain” (Revelation 21:4). What a blessed alternative! - 한 사람이 중한 병에 걸려 거의 죽을 뻔하다가 살아났다고 가정해 봅시다. 그는 자기의 경험을 말하면서 생명을 건지게 된 그 수술에서 회복할 때에 통증이 매우 심했다고 말합니다. 그리고 나서 “다른 방법을 써보세요” 하고 농담조로 말하는 것입니다. 그리스도인들도 흔히 이렇게 말합니다. 그러면 농담과 같은 이 평범한 말에는 어떤 뜻이 들어 있을까요? 한시적인 이 세상에서 아픔을 견디며 사는 것이 죽어서 영원한 천국의 기쁨으로 들어가는 것보다 낫다는 뜻인가요? 다가올 세상의 삶은 지금 이 세상에서 누리는 삶에 비하여 훨씬 더 좋다는 것을 우리는 알고 있습니다. 바울사도는 “내게 사는 것이 그리스도니 죽는 것도 유익함이니라…떠나서 그리스도와 함께 있을 욕망을 가진 이것이 더욱 좋으리라”(빌 1:21, 23)고 하였습니다. 물론 우리는 하나님의 은혜로써 우리가 지금 이곳에서 누리고 있는 주님으로부터의 물질적 축복과 섭리하심, 그리고 모든 귀한 인간 관계에 대해 감사를 드립니다. 그러나 우리 그리스도인들은 천국에 들어가는 것보다 죄로 물든 이 땅위에 사는 것이 낫다는 말에 농담으로라도 동의해서는 안됩니다. 우리는 천국에서 주 예수 그리스도와 만나는 기쁨을 간절히 사모하는 사람들입니다 (고후 5:8). 어느 날엔가 “다시 사망이 없고 애통하는 것이나 곡하는 것이나 아픈 것이 다시 있지 아니한다”(계 21:4)고 하였습니다. 얼마나 복된 선택입니까?
A Blessed Person(복 있는 사람)/ Psalms 1:1-3(시1:1-3)/ Pastor Heunggyu Kim(김흥규 목사)/ 2006-01-11
A Blessed Person(복 있는 사람) Psalms 1:1-3(시1:1-3) A Blessed Person Psalms 1:1-3 There is a special television program that aired on Korea’s Seoul Broadcast Service station to commemorate the 10-year anniversary of the station. Called “Duk Yi,” this program looked like it was made a long time ago. But on the International Channel of the cable TV, this program is aired every week. It is a story about a young girl named Guiduk, whose family members, except for her mother and one older brother, is all out of control. Her father is a dance instructor and a notorious free-spender. Her oldest brother is an ignorant hoodlum. To boot, her older sister takes away all blessings destined for her. But the viewers like this drama because of Guiduk. Despite all the difficulties, she succeeds, and the viewers get inspired watching her story. We call a person like Guiduk a good fortune. Because of her, happiness comes knocking on her family’s door. There are people in this world worthy of blessings. During this first worship service of the New Year, let’s think about whom should be blessed. Listen to today’s words, and become a blessed person yourselves. Psalms 1 acts as a prologue to the entire testament of Psalms. It contains the words that form the basis of rest of the 150 chapters of Psalms. Therefore, it comes before all the other chapters. Psalms 1 sharply contrasts a ‘blessed person’ and a ‘person without blessings.’ Those who are blessed walk the path of the righteous; those who are not walk the path of evil (verse 6). Psalms 1 introduces us to these two sharply different paths to choose from. Then who is this ‘blessed person’ mentioned in Psalms 1? When we consider this question, we must remember that the ‘blessing’ mentioned in the Bible is different from what an average person would consider a blessing. People say that one is blessed when one’s wishes come true. For example, if everyone in a household live long without disease, earn a lot of money, the husband succeeds in business, and children go to good schools, then people call that family blessed. But when Psalms 1 defines a blessed person, it is different from the secular and materialistic definition of ‘blessing.’ Then who is a blessed person? He is the one who walks not in the counsel of the ungodly, does not stand in the path of a sinner, nor sits in the seat of the scornful. According to verse 1, blessed one doesn’t do three things. Foremost, he does not heed the “counsel of the ungodly.” According to the English version NRSV, he does not follow the “advice of the wicked.” What does this mean? The blessed one does not listen to advice from people who live without God, who only live with evil and secular thoughts in their minds. The blessed one does not listen to bad advice from people who live with impure thoughts in their minds. If you go out into the world, you can see many people like this. People who swindle and deceive others are out there in numbers. The blessed one does not listen to advice from these people. Next, the blessed one does not stand in the “path of a sinner.” Who is a sinner? It is those who commits a crime. Among crimes, there are petty crimes—like lying, hating, having impure thoughts—and there are major crimes, like theft and murder. When we say sin, people often think of people who commit one of these major crimes. But the Bible states that anyone who lives without God is a sinner. Therefore, the epistle of Romans states that there are no righteous people, only those who have committed sins who cannot receive the glory of God (Romans 3: 10, 23). So those who live without considering God as their Master, those who consider themselves the master of their lives are sinners. A blessed person does not take this path, the path without God. Lastly, a blessed person does not sit in “the seat of the scornful.” The English version of NRSV states, “the seat of the scoffers,” the ones who laugh at others. What do they scorn or scoff at? They scorn and scoff at God. They do not offer the throne of their lives to their Creator, God. Instead, they declare themselves king. They become arrogant. A blessed person does not get trapped in self-righteousness and scoff at the words of God. If a blessed person does not do the three things mentioned above, then what does he do? A blessed person’s delight is in the law of the Lord, and in His law he meditates day and night. Take a look at verse 2. A blessed person’s “delight is in the law of the Lord, and in His law he meditates day and night.” He does not listen to the advice of the ungodly, does not stand in the path of sinners, and does not sit in the seat of the scornful. Rather, he enjoys God’s words and mediates on it. In Hebrew, the word for law is ‘Torah.’ ‘Torah’ can be the law, or commandments, of Moses; here, it can also mean the ‘instruction of God.’ A person without blessings listens to the advice of the deceitful ungodly, with no regards to God’s instructions. But a blessed person lives according to God’s instructions given to him, the word of God. A person without blessings has no God, lives without God’s words, and stands in the path of sinners. But a blessed person bring God into the center of their lives and live according to His words in leading a righteous life. A person without blessings ignores God and scoffs at His words, leading an arrogant life. A blessed person humbles himself before God and leads a life full of humility. In short, a blessed person, day and night, sitting or standing, coming or going, meditates God’s words and leads his life according to those words. The slogan of our church this year is “A church that understands God’s words: Entire congregation reads the Bible front to back.” Many people carry the Bible, yet does not seriously read it. There is no more important tool in understanding God and His words than the Bible. The Bible is one of the most important means to reach God’s salvation and graces. Without reading the Bible in detail, one cannot understand God’s intent. One cannot become a good Christian without having the Bible nearby. John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of the Methodist church, once called himself ‘homo uinus libri,’ or ‘a person of the one book.’ He called himself ‘a man of the Bible.’ His sermons always started with the Bible and ended with the Bible. His writings and books were always full of quotes from the Bible. People called Wesley and his followers ‘Bible moths.’ Over the course of this year, all members of our congregation should be able to read the Bible in its entirety. The Bible is divided into 39 books in the Old Testament and 27 books in the New Testament, for a total of 66 books. There are 929 chapters in the Old Testament and 260 chapters in the New Testament, for a total of 1,189 chapters. If one reads about 4 pages a day, then one can finish reading the Bible in a year. I plan to give expositionary sermons, the ones that completely break down and analyze the Bible, during daily morning services, Wednesday evening services, Friday prayer services, and Sunday evening services. We must, above all, concentrate our efforts on correctly understanding the Bible. This happened in a church in America. A male Christian of the church, who devoutly attended all services, was asked a question about the wife of the nephew of Abraham, Lot, in Genesis. He quickly answered, “Oh, she was a pillar of salt by day and a pillar of fire by night!” In this New Year, we must rejoice in God’s words and truly understand His words. After understanding His words, we must put them into action. During the summer of 1996, in Dadeville, Alabama, two people had a contest of who knew more about the Bible in front of an apartment. One of those two people, Gabel Taylor, had an older brother who was a minister. Therefore, he knew quite a bit about the Bible. They were contesting their knowledge about the Bible when a particular verse from the Bible led them to an argument. After a long debate, Taylor, whose brother was a minister, won the argument. But the loser of the contest was beside himself with anger. He went into his house, grabbed a gun, and shot Taylor in the face, killing him on the spot. What does this tragedy teach us? No matter how much one knows about the Bible, it all means nothing if that knowledge is not put into action. This year, it is important for us to know and learn a lot about the Bible. But we must not forget that putting that knowledge into action is much, much more important. When we put God’s words into action, people will know that we are true Christians! Then what happens to a blessed person? Whatever he does will prosper and God will recognize him. Take a look at verse 3 of today’s scripture. “He shall be like a tree, Planted by the rivers of water, That brings forth is fruit in its season, Whose leaf also shall not wither, And whatever he does shall prosper.” For those like us, who live in a good environment, the magnitude of this blessing is hard to grasp. But for those people who live in a desert, like Israel and the Middle East, these words will seem like Eden. People living in a dry region, where lack of rain brings about great dust storms, the words of verse 3 are a Godsend. A tree planted in the river bed, with its roots in water always bearing fruit year-round—these words will remind the people of Middle East of Eden, where Adam and Eve once lived. Similar words appear in Jeremiah 17: 7-8. “Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, and whose hope is in the Lord. For he shall be like a tree planted by the waters, which spreads out its roots by the river, and will not fear when heat comes; but her leaf will be green, and will not be anxious in the year of drought, nor will cease from yielding fruit.” What great words! For those who depend on God, who rejoice in His words, who meditate His words, and who live according to His words, these blessings will follow. Neither drought nor heat will prevent beautiful fruits from blooming. The leaves will always be green and vibrant. And they will be successful and prosperous in all they do! The blessings defined in Psalms 1 are much different than the definition of the secular world. This blessing is an internal blessing given by God. Regardless of our material wealth, authority we have, or how successful our children may be, this is a continual blessing given by God. People who receive this blessing are happy, even though they may be persecuted for believing in God. They are thankful even when their businesses fail and lose their wealth. It is because this blessing is not of this world. It is a gift from God. It is a blessing that allows us to be satisfied and joyous in one entity: God. 2003 is dawning upon us. I wish a Happy New Year to each and every one of you. Do not be a person without blessings, following the advice of the ungodly. Do not stand in the path of sinners; do not sit in the seat of the scornful. Instead, standing or sitting, day or night, rejoice in God’s words. Read it and reflect on it. And put it to action with zeal. Become the righteous people that God will recognize. Above all, be like the tree on the riverbank—always full of fruit, regardless of season. I hope in the name of our Lord that each one of you will be a blessed person! Amen Pastor Heunggyu Kim(김흥규 목사)(Incheon Naeri Methodist Church(인천 내리감리교회))
A Caution Against Bigotry(편협한 신앙에 대한 경고)/ Philippians 3:12(빌3:12)/ Pastor John Wesley(요한 웨슬리 목사)/ 영어설교(English Sermons)/ 1742-04-02
A Caution Against Bigotry(편협한 신앙에 대한 경고) Philippians 3:12(빌3:12) A Caution Against Bigotry Philippians 3:12 “And John answered him, saying, Master, we saw one casting out devils in Thy name: and he followeth not us: and we forbad him, because he followeth not us. But Jesus said, Forbid him not.” Philippians 3:12 Mark 9:38, 39 1. In the preceding verses we read, that after the Twelve had been disputing “which of them should be the greatest,” Jesus took a little child, and set him in the midst of them, and taking him in his arms, said unto them, “Whosoever shall receive one of these little children in My name, receiveth me; and whosoever receiveth me, receiveth not me” only, “but him that sent me.” Then “John answered,” that is, said, with reference to what our Lord had spoken just before, “Master, we saw one casting out devils in Thy name, and we forbad him, because he followeth not us.” As if he had said, “Ought we to have received him? In receiving him, should we have received thee? Ought we not rather to have forbidden him? Did not we do well therein?” “But Jesus said, Forbid him not.” 2. The same passage is recited by St. Luke, and almost in the same words. But it may be asked, “What is this to us, seeing no man now casts out devils? Has not the power of doing this been withdrawn from the church, for twelve or fourteen hundred years? How then are we concerned in the case here proposed, or in our Lord’s decision of it?” 3. Perhaps more nearly than is commonly imagined; the case proposed being no uncommon case. That we may reap our full advantage from it, I design to show, I. first, in what sense men may, and do, now cast out devils: II. secondly, what we may understand by, “He followeth not us.” I shall, III. thirdly, explain our Lord’s direction, “Forbid him not;” and IV. conclude with an inference from the whole. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I. 1. I am, in the first place, to show, in what sense men may, and do, now cast out devils. In order to have the clearest view of this, we should remember, that (according to the scriptural account) as God dwells and works in the children of light, so the devil dwells and works in the children of darkness. As the Holy Spirit possesses the souls of good men, so the evil spirit possesses the souls of the wicked. Hence it is that the Apostle terms him “the god of this world;” from the uncontrolled power he has over worldly men. Hence our blessed Lord styles him “the prince of this world;” so absolute is his dominion over it. And hence St. John: “We know that we are of God, and” all who are not of God, “the whole world,” “en tOi ponErOiI keitaiI,” --not lieth in wickedness, but “lieth in the wicked one;” lives and moves in him, as they who are not of the world do in God. 2. For the devil is not to be considered only as “a roaring lion going about seeking whom he may devour;” nor barely as a subtle enemy, who cometh unawares upon poor souls, and “leads them captive at his will;” but as he who dwelleth in them, and walketh in them; who ruleth the darkness or wickedness of this world (of worldly men and all their dark designs and actions), by keeping possession of their hearts, setting up his throne there, and bringing every thought into obedience to himself. Thus the “strong one armed keepeth his house;” and if this “unclean spirit” sometimes “go out of a man,” yet he often returns with “seven spirits worse than himself, and they enter in and dwell there.” Nor can he be idle in his dwelling. He is continually “working in” these “children of disobedience.” He works in them with power, with mighty energy, transforming them into his own likeness, effacing all the remains of the image of God, and preparing them for every evil word and work. 3. It is, therefore, an unquestionable truth, that the god and prince of this world still possesses all who know not God. Only the manner wherein he possesses them now differs from that wherein he did it of old time. Then he frequently tormented their bodies as well as souls, and that openly, without any disguise: now he torments their souls only (unless in some rare cases), and that as covertly as possible. The reason of this difference is plain: it was then his aim to drive mankind into superstition; therefore, he wrought as openly as he could. But it is his aim to drive us into infidelity; therefore, he works as privately as he can: for the more secret he is, the more he prevails. 4. Yet, if we may credit historians, there are countries, even now, where he works as openly as aforetime. “But why in savage and barbarous countries only? Why not in Italy, France, or England?” For a very plain reason: he knows his men, and he knows what he hath to do with each. To Laplanders he appears barefaced; because he is to fix them in superstition and gross idolatry. But with you he is pursuing a different point. He is to make you idolize yourselves; to make you wiser in your own eyes than God himself, than all the oracles of God. Now, in order to do this, he must not appear in his own shape: that would frustrate his design. No: He uses all his art to make you deny his being, till he has you safe in his own place. 5. He reigns, therefore, although in a different way, yet as absolute in one land as in the other. He has the gay Italian infidel in his teeth, as sure as the wild Tartar. But he is fast asleep in the mouth of the lion, who is too wise to wake him out of sleep. So he only plays with him for the present, and when he pleases, swallows him up! The god of this world holds his English worshippers full as fast as those in Lapland. But it is not his business to affright them, lest they should fly to the God of heaven. The prince of darkness, therefore, does not appear, while he rules over these his willing subjects. The conqueror holds his captives so much the safer, because they imagine themselves at liberty. Thus “the strong one armed keepeth his house, and his goods are in peace;” neither the Deist nor nominal Christian suspects he is there: so he and they are perfectly at peace with each other. 6. All this while he works with energy in them. He blinds the eyes of their understanding, so that the light of the glorious gospel of Christ cannot shine upon them. He chains their souls down to earth and hell, with the chains of their own vile affections. He binds them down to the earth, by love of the world, love of money, of pleasure, of praise. And by pride, envy, anger, hate, revenge, he causes their souls to draw nigh unto hell; acting the more secure and uncontrolled, because they know not that he acts at all. 7. But how easily may we know the cause from its effects! These are sometimes gross and palpable. So they were in the most refined of the heathen nations. Go no farther than the admired, the virtuous Romans; and you will find these, when at the height of their learning and glory, “filled with all unrighteousness, fornication, wickedness, covetousness, maliciousness; full of envy, murder, debate, deceit, malignity; whisperers, backbiters, despiteful, proud, boasters, disobedient to parents, covenant-breakers, without natural affection, implacable, unmerciful.” 8. The strongest parts of this description are confirm!!ed by one whom some may think a more unexceptionable witness. I mean their brother heathen, Dion Cassius; who observes, that, before Caesar’s return from Gaul, not only gluttony and lewdness of every kind were open and barefaced; not only falsehood, injustice, and unmercifulness abounded, in public courts, as well as private families; but the most outrageous robberies, rapine, and murders were so frequent in all parts of Rome, that few men went out of doors without making their wills, as not knowing if they should return alive! 9. As gross and palpable are the works of the devil among many (if not all) the modern heathens. The natural religion of the Creeks, Cherokees, Chickasaws, and all other Indians bordering on our southern settlements (not of a few single men, but of entire nations), is to torture all their prisoners from morning till night, till at length they roast them to death; and upon the slightest undesigned provocation, to come behind and shoot any of their own countrymen! Yea, it is a common thing among them, for the son, if he thinks his father lives too long, to knock out his brains; and for mother, if she is tired of her children, to fasten stones about their necks, and throw three or four of them into the river, one after another! 10. It were to be wished, that none but heathens had practised such gross, palpable works of the devil. But we dare not say so. Even in cruelty and bloodshed, how little have the Christians come behind them! And not the Spaniards or Portuguese alone, butchering thousands in South America: not the Dutch only in the East Indies, or the French in North America, following the Spaniards step by step: our own countrymen, too, have wantoned in blood, and exterminated whole nations; plainly proving thereby what spirit it is that dwells and works in the children of disobedience. 11. These monsters might almost make us overlook the works of the devil that are wrought in our own country. But, alas! we cannot open our eyes even here, without seeing them on every side. Is it a small proof of his power, that common swearers, drunkards, whoremongers, adulterers, thieves, robbers, sodomites, murderers, are still found in every part of our land? How triumphant does the prince of this world reign in all these children of disobedience! 12. He less openly, but no less effectually, works in dissemblers, tale-bearers, liars, slanderers; in oppressors and extortioners, in the perjured, the seller of his friend, his honour, his conscience, his country. And yet these may talk of religion or conscience still; of honour, virtue, and public spirit! But they can no more deceive Satan than they can God. He likewise knows those that are his: and a great multitude they are, out of every nation and people, of whom he has full possession at this day. 13. If you consider this, you cannot but see in what sense men may now also cast out devils: yea, and every Minister of Christ does cast them out, if his Lord’s work prosper in his hand. By the power of God attending his word, he brings these sinners to repentance; an entire inward as well as outward change, from all evil to all good. And this is, in a sound sense, to cast out devils, out of the souls wherein they had hitherto dwelt. The strong one can no longer keep his house. A stronger than he is come upon him, and hath cast him out, and taken possession for himself, and made it an habitation of God through his Spirit. Here, then, the energy of Satan ends, and the Son of God “destroys the works of the devil.” The understanding of the sinner is now enlightened, and his heart sweetly drawn to God. His desires are refined, his affections purified; and, being filled with the Holy Ghost, he grows in grace till he is not only holy in heart, but in all manner of conversation. 14. All this is indeed the work of God. It is God alone who can cast out Satan. But he is generally pleased to do this by man as an instrument in his hand: who is then said to cast out devils in his name, by his power and authority. And he sends whom he will send upon this great work; but usually such as man would never have thought of: for “His ways are not as our ways, neither his thoughts as our thoughts.” Accordingly, he chooses the weak to confound the mighty; the foolish to confound the wise; for this plain reason, that he may secure the glory to himself; that “no flesh may glory in his sight.” -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- II. 1. But shall we not forbid one who thus “casteth out devils,” if “he followeth not us”? This, it seems, was both the judgement and practice of the Apostle, till he referred the case to his Master. “We forbad him,” saith he, “because he followeth not us!” which he supposed to be a very sufficient reason. What we may understand by this expression!!, “He followeth not us,” is the next point to be considered. The lowest circumstance we can understand thereby, is, he has no outward connexion with us. We do not labour in conjunction with each other. He is not our fellow-helper in the gospel. And indeed whensoever our Lord is pleased to send many labourers into his harvest, they cannot all act in subordination to, or connexion with, each other. Nay, they cannot be personal acquaintance with, nor be so much as known to, one another. Many there will necessarily be, in different parts of the harvest, so far from having any mutual intercourse, that they will be as absolute strangers to each other as if they had lived in different ages. And concerning any of these whom we know not, we may doubtless say, “He followeth not us.” 2. A Second meaning of this expression!! may be, --he is not of our party. It has long been matter of melancholy consideration to all who pray for the peace of Jerusalem, that so many several parties are still subsisting among those who are all styled Christians. This has been particularly observable in our own countrymen, who have been continually dividing from each other, upon points of no moment, and many times such as religion had no concern in. The most trifling circumstances have given rise to different parties, which have continued for many generations; and each of these would be ready to object to one who was on the other side, “He followeth not us.” 3. That expression!! may mean, Thirdly, --he differs from us in our religious opinions. There was a time when all Christians were of one mind, as well as of one heart, so great grace was upon them all, when they were first filled with the Holy Ghost! But how short a space did this blessing continue! How soon was that unanimity lost! and difference of opinion sprang up again, even in the church of Christ, --and that not in nominal but in real Christians; nay, in the very chief of them, the Apostles themselves! Nor does it appear that the difference which then began was ever entirely removed. We do not find that even those pillars in the temple of God, so long as they remained upon the earth, were ever brought to think alike, to be of one mind, particularly with regard to the ceremonial law. It is therefore no way surprising, that infinite varieties of opinion should now be found in the Christian church. A very probable consequence of this is, that whenever we see any “casting out devils,” he will be one that, in this sense, “followeth not us” --that is not of our opinion. It is scarce to be imagined he will be of our mind in all points, even of religion. He may very probably think in a different manner from us, even on several subjects of import!!ance; such as the nature and use of the moral law, the eternal decrees of God, the sufficiency and efficacy of his grace, and the perseverance of his children. 4. He may differ from us, Fourthly, not only in opinion, but likewise in some point of practice. He may not approve of that manner of worshipping God which is practised in our congregation; and may judge that to be more profitable for his soul which took its rise from Calvin or Martin Luther. He may have many objections to that Liturgy which we approve of beyond all others; many doubts concerning that form of church government which we esteem both apostolical and scriptural. Perhaps he may go farther from us yet: he may, from a principle of conscience, refrain from several of those which we believe to be the ordinances of Christ. Or, if we both agree that they are ordained of God, there may still remain a difference between us, either as to the manner of administering those ordinances, or the persons to whom they should be administered. Now the unavoidable consequence of any of these differences will be, that he who thus differs from us must separate himself, with regard to those points, from our society. In this respect, therefore, “he followeth not us”: he is not (as we phrase it) “of our Church.” 5. But in a far stronger sense “he followeth not us,” who is not only of a different Church, but of such a Church as we account to be in many respects anti-scriptural and anti-Christian, --a Church which we believe to be utterly false and erroneous in her doctrines, as well as very dangerously wrong in her practice; guilty of gross superstition as well as idolatry, --a Church that has added many articles to the faith which was once delivered to the saints; that has dropped one whole commandment of God, and made void several of the rest by her traditions; and that, pretending the highest veneration for, and strictest conformity to, the ancient Church, has nevertheless brought in numberless innovations, without any warrant either from antiquity or Scripture. Now, most certainly, “he followeth not us,” who stands at so great a distance from us. 6. And yet there may be a still wider difference than this. He who differs from us in judgement or practice, may possibly stand at a greater distance from us in affection than in judgement. And this indeed is a very natural and a very common effect of the other. The differences which begin in points of opinion seldom terminate there. They generally spread into the affections, and then separate chief friends. Nor are any animosities so deep and irreconcilable as those that spring from disagreement in religion. For this cause the bitterest enemies of a man are those of his own household. For this the father rises against his own children, and the children against the father; and perhaps persecute each other even to the death, thinking all the time they are doing God service. It is therefore nothing more than we may expect, if those who differ from us, either in religious opinions or practice, soon contract a sharpness, yea, bitterness towards us; if they are more and more prejudiced against us, till they conceive as ill an opinion of our persons as of our principles. An almost necessary consequence of this will be, they will speak in the same manner as they think of us. They will set themselves in opposition to us, and, as far as they are able, hinder our work; seeing it does not appear to them to be the work of God, but either of man or of the devil. He that thinks, speaks, and acts in such a manner as this, in the highest sense, “followeth not us.” 7. I do not indeed conceive, that the person of whom the Apostle speaks in the text (although we have no particular account of him, either in the context, or in any other part of holy writ) went so far as this. We have no ground to suppose that there was any material difference between him and the Apostles, much less that he had any prejudice either against them or their Master. It seems we may gather thus much from our Lord’s own words, which immediately follow the text: “There is no man which shall do a miracle in My name, that can lightly speak evil of me.” But I purposely put the case in the strongest light, adding all the circumstances which can well be conceived, that, being forewarned of the temptation in its full strength, we may in no case yield to it, and fight against God. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- III. 1. Suppose, then, a man have no intercourse with us, suppose he be not of our party, suppose he separate from our Church, yea, and widely differ from us, both in judgement, practice, and affection; yet if we see even this man “casting out devils,” Jesus saith, “Forbid him not.” This import!!ant direction of our Lord I am, in the Third place, to explain. 2. If we see this man casting out devils: But it is well if, in such a case, we would believe even what we saw with our eyes, if we did not give the lie to our own senses. He must be little acquainted with human nature who does not immediately perceive how extremely unready we should be to believe that any man does cast out devils who “followeth not us” in all or most of the senses above recited: I had almost said, in any of them, seeing we may easily learn even from what passes in our own breasts, how unwilling men are to allow anything good in those who do not in all things agree with themselves. 3. “But what is a sufficient, reasonable proof, that a man does (in the sense above) cast out devils?” The answer is easy. Is there full proof, (1) That a person before us was a gross, open sinner? (2) That he is not so now? that he has broke off his sins, and lives a Christian life? And (3) That this change was wrought by his hearing this man preach? If these three points be plain and undeniable, then you have sufficient, reasonable proof, such as you cannot resist without wilful sin, that this man casts out devils. 4. Then “forbid him not.” Beware how you attempt to hinder him, either by your authority, or arguments, or persuasions. Do not in any wise strive to prevent his using all the power which God has given him. If you have authority with him, do not use that authority to stop the work of God. Do not furnish him with reasons why he ought not any more to speak in the name of Jesus. Satan will not fail to supply him with these, if you do not second him therein. Persuade him not to depart from the work. If he should give place to the devil and you, many souls might perish in their iniquity, but their blood would God require at your hands. 5. “But what, if he be only a layman, who casts out devils! Ought I not to forbid him then?” Is the fact allowed? Is there reasonable proof that this man has or does cast out devils? If there is, forbid him not; no, not at the peril of your soul. Shall not God work by whom he will work? No man can do these works unless God is with him; unless God hath sent him for this very thing. But if God hath sent him, will you call him back? Will you forbid him to go? 6. “But I do not know that he is sent of God.” “Now herein is a marvellous thing” (may any of the seals of his mission say, any whom he hath brought from Satan to God), “that ye know not whence this man is, and, behold, he hath opened mine eyes! If this man were not of God, he could do nothing.” If you doubt the fact, send for the parents of the man: send for his brethren, friends, acquaintance. But if you cannot doubt this, if you must needs acknowledge “that a notable miracle hath been wrought” then with what conscience, with what face, can you charge him whom God hath sent, “not to speak any more in his name”? 7. I allow, that it is highly expedient, whoever preaches in his name should have an outward as well as an inward call, but that it is absolutely necessary, I deny. “Nay, is not the Scripture express? ‘No man taketh this honour unto himself, but he that is called of God, as was Aaron.’ ” (Heb. 5:4) Numberless times has this text been quoted on the occasion, as containing the very strength of the cause; but surely never was so unhappy a quotation. For, First, Aaron was not called to preach at all: he was called “to offer gifts and sacrifice for sin.” That was his peculiar employment. Secondly, these men do not offer sacrifice at all, but only preach; which Aaron did not. Therefore it is not possible to find one text in all the Bible which is more wide of the point than this. 8. “But what was the practice of the apostolic age?” You may easily see in the Acts of the Apostles. In the eighth chapter we read, “There was a great persecution against the church which was at Jerusalem; and they were all scattered abroad throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the Apostles.” (Verse 1) “Therefore they that were scattered abroad went everywhere preaching the word.” (Verse 4) Now, were all these outwardly called to preach? No man in his senses can think so. Here, then, is an undeniable proof, what was the practice of the apostolic age. Here you see not one, but a multitude of lay preachers, men that were only sent of God. 9. Indeed, so far is the practice of the apostolic age from inclining us to think it was unlawful for a man to preach before he was ordained, that we have reason to think it was then accounted necessary. Certainly the practice and the direction of the Apostle Paul was, to prove a man before he was ordained at all. “Let these” (the deacons), says he, “first be proved; then let them use the office of a deacon.” (1 Tim. 3:10) Proved, how? By setting them to construe a sentence of Greek and asking them a few commonplace questions? O amazing proof of a Minister of Christ! Nay; but by making a clear, open trial (as is still done by most of the Protestant Churches of Europe) not only whether their lives be holy and unblamable, but whether they have such gifts as are absolutely and indispensably necessary in order to edify the church of Christ. 10. But what if a man has these, and has brought sinners to repentance, and yet the Bishop will not ordain him? Then the Bishop does forbid him to cast out devils. But I dare not forbid him: I have published my reasons to all the world. Yet it is still insisted I ought to do it. You who insist upon it answer those reasons. I know not that any have done this yet, or even made an attempt of doing it. Only some have spoken of them as very weak and trifling: and this was prudent enough; for it is far easier to despise, at least seem to despise, an argument, than to answer it. Yet till this is done I must say, when I have reasonable proof that any man does cast out devils, whatever others do, I dare not forbid him, lest I be found even to fight against God. 11. And whosoever thou art that fearest God, “forbid him not, either directly or indirectly. There are many ways of doing this. You indirectly forbid him, if you either wholly deny, or despise and make little account of, the work which God has wrought by his hands. You indirectly forbid him, when you discourage him in his work, by drawing him into disputes concerning it, by raising objections against it, or frightening him with consequences which very possibly will never be. You forbid him when you show any unkindness toward him either in language or behaviour! and much more when you speak of him to others either in an unkind or a contemptuous manner; when you endeavour to represent him to any either in an odious or a despicable light. You are forbidding him all the time you are speaking evil of him, or making no account of his labours. O forbid him not in any of these ways; nor by forbidding others to hear him, --by discouraging sinners from hearing that word which is able to save their souls! 12. Yea, if you would observe our Lord’s direction in its full meaning and extent, then remember his word: “He that is not for us is against us; and he that gathereth not with me scattereth”: he that gathereth not men into the kingdom of God, assuredly scatters them from it. For there can be no neuter in this war. Every one is either on God’s side, or on Satan’s. Are you on God’s side? Then you will not only not forbid any man that casts out devils, but you will labour, to the uttermost of your power, to forward him in the work. You will readily acknowledge the work of God, and confess the greatness of it. You will remove all difficulties and objections, as far as may be, out of his way. You will strengthen his hands by speaking honourably of him before all men, and avowing the things which you have seen and heard. You will encourage others to attend upon his word, to hear him whom God hath sent. And you will omit no actual proof of tender love, which God gives you an opportunity of showing him. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- IV. 1. If we willingly fail in any of these points, if we either directly or indirectly forbid him, “because he followeth not us,” then we are bigots. This is the inference I draw from what has been said. But the term “bigotry,” I fear, as frequently as it is used, is almost as little understood as “enthusiasm.” It is too strong an attachment to, or fondness for, our own party, opinion, church, and religion. Therefore he is a bigot who is so fond of any of these, so strongly attached to them, as to forbid any who casts out devils because he differs from himself in any or all these particulars. 2. Do you beware of this. Take care (1) That you do not convict yourself of bigotry, by your unreadiness to believe that any man does cast out devils, who differs from you. And if you are clear thus far, if you acknowledge the fact, then examine yourself, (2) Am I not convicted of bigotry in this, in forbidding him directly or indirectly? Do I not directly forbid him on this ground, because he is not of my party, because he does not fall in with my opinions, or because he does not worship God according to that scheme of religion which I have received from my fathers? 3. Examine yourself, Do I not indirectly at least forbid him, on any of these grounds? Am I not sorry that God should thus own and bless a man that holds such erroneous opinions? Do I not discourage him, because he is not of my Church, by disputing with him concerning it, by raising objections, and by perplexing his mind with distant consequences? Do I show no anger, contempt, or unkindness of any sort, either in my words or actions? Do I not mention behind his back, his (real or supposed) faults --his defects or infirmities? Do not I hinder sinners from hearing his word? If you do any of these things, you are a bigot to this day. 4. “Search me, O Lord, and prove me. Try out my reins and my heart! Look well if there be any way of” bigotry “in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.” In order to examine ourselves thoroughly, let the case be proposed in the strongest manner. What, if I were to see a Papist, an Arian, a Socinian casting out devils? If I did, I could not forbid even him, without convicting myself of bigotry. Yea, if it could be supposed that I should see a Jew, a Deist, or a Turk, doing the same, were I to forbid him either directly or indirectly, I should be no better than a bigot still. 5. O stand clear of this! But be not content with not forbidding any that casts out devils. It is well to go thus far; but do not stop here. If you will avoid all bigotry, go on. In every instance of this kind, whatever the instrument be, acknowledge the finger of God. And not only acknowledge, but rejoice in his work, and praise his name with thanksgiving. Encourage whomsoever God is pleased to employ, to give himself wholly up thereto. Speak well of him wheresoever you are; defend his character and his mission. Enlarge, as far as you can, his sphere of action; show him all kindness in word and deed; and cease not to cry to God in his behalf, that he may save both himself and them that hear him. 6. I need add but one caution: Think not the bigotry of another is any excuse for your own. It is not impossible, that one who casts out devils himself, may yet forbid you so to do. You may observe, this is the very case mentioned in the text. The Apostles forbade another to do what they did themselves. But beware of retorting. It is not your part to return evil for evil. Another’s not observing the direction of our Lord, is no reason why you should neglect it. Nay, but let him have all the bigotry to himself. If he forbid you, do not you forbid him. Rather labour, and watch, and pray the more, to confirm!! your love toward him. If he speak all manner of evil of you, speak all manner of good (that is true) of him. Imitate herein that glorious saying of a great man, (O that he had always breathed the same spirit!) “Let Luther call me a hundred devils; I will still reverence him as a messenger of God.” Pastor John Wesley
A challenge to be great(크게 되려고 하는 도전)/ Matthew 20:17-28(마20:17-28)/ 2006-02-03
A challenge to be great(크게 되려고 하는 도전) Matthew 20:17-28(마20:17-28) A challenge to be great Matthew 20:17-28 INTRODUCTION The setting for our text today is a time of crisis. Jesus is nearing the day of suffering and death on the cross. He takes His disciples off for a moment away from the crowd: perhaps for refreshing and energizing, but also for encouragement. It is during this momentary break that Jesus is confronted with the worldly ambitions of James and John along with their mother. Let us see how He handles their desire for pre-eminence in His Kingdom. In doing so, Jesus discusses what true greatness really is. I. MISGUIDED MOTIVES (vv. 20-21) 1. There will always be women who are status seekers. 2. There will always be men who are power hungry. II. CRITICAL CONSIDERATIONS (vv. 22-23) 1. Pre-eminence in His Kingdom is based upon suffering. 2. Pre-eminence demands service rendered in a spirit of love, not for reward. III. WORLDLY WAYS (vv. 24-25) 1. Those who seek pre-eminence stir up anger and jealousy. 2. Those who seek pre-eminence define greatness as exercising authority and ruling. IV. GODLY GREATNESS (vv. 26-27) 1. Whoever desires to be great in God’s Kingdom must be a servant. 2. Whoever desires to be pre-eminent must become a slave. V. ETERNAL EXAMPLE (v. 28) 1. Jesus did not come to be served, but to serve. 2. Jesus came to give His life for others. CONCLUSION These men and their mother got answers they were not expecting. They had hoped to reign with Jesus, to be lords over others. However, Jesus intends for His followers to be servants of others, not lords over others. He redefines greatness as ministering, as serving, as showing love in action out of a spirit of humility. True greatness involves giving your life for others, not asking others to give their lives for you! Do you understand this simple lesson from Jesus? If you do, then begin to practice the message in your life by serving others in a spirit of humility and of love. Illustration: A poor Scottish Farmer named Fleming. Pastor Dr. Glenn A. Jent
A Holy Boldness(거룩한 용기)/ Psalms 27:(시27:)/ 2015-03-23
A Holy Boldness(거룩한 용기) Psalms 27:(시27:) I encourage you to open your Bible to Psalm 27. It’s a great Psalm. Ponder with me some of the incredible thoughts that the Psalmist wants to share with us. They are words of encouragement and words of hope, words of great confidence and great joy—the kind of words that speak to the heart that droops. We need these words because life is hard some of the time or most of the time—hopefully, not all of the time. This past week I had a friend who lost his daughter in a tragic accident. The week before, one of my dear friends lost his job and his income. My own daughter struggles with health problems. Life is precarious when security is threatened, when your witness and ministry is overwhelmed, when a relationship is compromised, when you feel intensely alone. I’m aware that some of you sitting in this room this morning are feeling some of those emotions. This is a special word to you today because life is such an insecure thing. Achievements vanish over night. Applause fades. Friends become foe. Sometimes we wonder if anyone really cares at all. That’s what drives me back again and again to Psalms—these are really songs of our lives. They encapsulate in so many ways every human emotion: songs of praise and songs of lament, songs of consolation, songs of encouragement, songs of celebration. In Psalm 27, the Psalmist has evidently been attacked by enemies (verse 2), is living under the threat of eminent war, (verse 3), excommunicated from the community of faith (verse 4), in trouble (verse 5), rejection (verse 9), his family disowns him (verse 10), and he is subject to slander (verse 12). Ironically, this is a song of hope—of cheerful comfort and joy—written long ago for such a day as ours. This was written for those who suffer, are sad and struggling. It begins with this incredible confidence exuding from the mouth of the Psalmist right from the beginning in verse 1, “The Lord is my light and my salvation. Whom shall I fear?” There is absolute certainty that seems to banish fear—no matter how great the threat happens to be. Will you notice on whom the Psalmist places his confidence? It’s not in himself. Rather, he says, “the Lord is these things to me. The Lord is my light and my salvation.” The Apostle John exuberantly writes, “in Him is life,” referring to Jesus, “and that life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, but the darkness has not understood it.” (John 1:4–5) The Lord is my light. The Lord is my salvation. Salvation finds us in the darkness but does not leave us there. The Psalmist is using light and salvation synonymously. Will you notice that he doesn’t say, “the Lord gives me light. The Lord gives me salvation.” This is what we might tend to think. He says, “the Lord is my light. The Lord is my salvation.” If the Lord is your light and your salvation, whom shall you fear? “The powers of darkness,” Paul says in writing to the Ephesians, “is that we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities.” He uses this terminology: “against rulers and authorities” and “against the powers of this dark world.” Martin Luther wrote in his great hymn, A Mighty Fortress: And though this world, with devils filled, should threaten to undo us, we will not fear for God hath willed his truth to triumph through us. The prince of darkness grim—we tremble not for him. His rage we can endure, for lo, his doom is sure. One little word shall fell him.” The Lord is my life and my salvation. Whom shall I fear? Regardless of how big the problem, when David focused upon the greatness of God, he realized danger was insignificant. He placed his confidence in the real power of the omnipotent “I am,” the creator God, the redeemer God. The Lord is my strength and the stronghold of my life, a place of safety, a light to guide, a stronghold to protect. That’s pretty neat. What I suggest to you is that you are pretty well covered: life, guide and protection. So he says a second time, “the Lord is my life and my salvation—whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life—of whom shall I be afraid?” Even if life itself is threatened, this holy boldness propels him through life’s turbulent waters, no matter what may come. Look at verses 2 and 3: “When evil men advance against me to devour my flesh, when my enemies and foes attack me, they will stumble and fall. Though an army besiege me, my heart will not fear; though war break out against me, even then will I be confident.” I do not need to tell you that there are situations in life that are difficult. There are times we know when people can be mean-spirited. You know that there are circumstances that are grossly unfair. It seems the Psalmist is echoing that thought in verse 2, that his enemies at times want to destroy him completely. He also has that great confidence that says they are going to fall flat on their face. Do you have that confidence in Jesus Christ? The secret is to keep focused; keep your eyes fixed on Jesus. Those who overcome are people who have their lives anchored in God. That’s easy to say and to appreciate, but sometimes it’s not so easy to live like that. I encourage you not to be so easily distracted by the cold shoulders, the criticism, the insults, the anger, and the hatred that you encounter from time to time. Remember that you are a child of the King. He is your light to guide you. He is your salvation to save you. He is your stronghold to protect you. Verse 4 is an incredible affirmation. It seems that the Psalmist craves only the protection and fellowship of God. His is not a divided loyalty, nor is he fragmented in his priorities. This is perhaps the most single-minded statement in the entire Bible. Mark it well. “One thing I ask of the Lord. This is what I seek…” One thing! If there is only one thing, then you will be rescued from all other kinds of distractions, from weakness, and from disappointment. What is the one thing? Yearning to experience more of the weightiness of God. The one thing is the desire to enjoy the constant presence of God for the rest of one’s life. With singleness of purpose, the priority within is to gaze upon the beauty of the Lord and to seek. “…to gaze upon the beauty of the Lord and to seek him in His temple.” This is the essence of worship: indeed, the essence of discipleship. It is important that we become preoccupied with God. Are you preoccupied with God? Does he consume every waking moment? When you have a moment to think, do you think of him? The Psalmist does. I’ve seen enough young people in love to know that is possible. I hear older folks saying it’s not possible to be consumed in love. If you have forgotten, go back and ask a young person in love, “Do you ever stop thinking about Joe or Jill?” “I can’t think of anything else. My life is complete. I’m in love!” Oh I remember those days. Some of us are still privileged to still feel that way. The Psalmist is in love with God. God consumes his every moment, his very being. Is that not our desire? “One thing I ask of the Lord, this is what I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze…and to seek.” Do not glimpses of Jesus Christ ravish your heart? Do you not find him altogether lovely? Do you not find in him one who is chief among 10,000? Does Jesus ravish your heart? John writes, “We have seen His glory, the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” To echo the words of the hymnist: Jesus is the sweetest name I know. He’s just the same as his lovely name. That’s the reason why I love him so. Jesus is the sweetest name I know. Now let us consider the context of the Psalm and the pain the Psalmist has to bear: the enemies that surround him, the war that surrounds him, the excommunication from the community of faith, the trouble, the rejection, the turning away by his own family, the slander that he has experienced. Of course one can trace painful circumstances several times in David’s life. I suspect he is in the wilderness, being pursued by Saul. You might expect in such painful circumstances that David would be self-absorbed. When trouble comes into your life, you tend to be self-absorbed. Yet, here is a picture of a man who set his heart on the pearl of greatness. He senses security in the presence of another. When trouble comes—and trouble will come—your heavenly Father will give you the best of shelter in the worst of danger. David understands that the foe may be all around him, but he is hidden. It’s an amazing concept. I wish we had the time to get into it even deeper. Let me tell you one quick story of Bishop James Hannington, a martyr to Jesus Christ. James Hannington was a Bishop in Eastern Equatorial Africa and an Englishman to boot! He wrote his last entry in his diary: “I felt they were coming upon me to murder me, but I sang Safe in the Arms of Jesus and laughed at the agony of my situation.” James Hannington knew that he was hidden in the bosom of Jesus Christ, who once said, “Don’t be afraid of those who can kill the body because that’s all they can do. If you must be afraid, be afraid of him whom can send your soul to hell.” It’s a great Psalm. By the time you get to verse 6 he says, “I will sing and make music to the Lord.” The Lord is my life and my salvation. Who is there to be afraid of? The Lord is the stronghold of my life. Don’t be afraid. Pastor Alan J. Meenan
A House Built on Rock(반석 위에 세운 집)/ Matthew 7:24-27(마7:24-27)/ 2009-10-24
A House Built on Rock(반석 위에 세운 집) Matthew 7:24-27(마7:24-27) A House Built on Rock Matthew 7:24-27 24 “Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. 25 The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. 26 But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. 27The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.”(Matthew 7:24-27) Today we celebrate foundation day. Today’s holiday celebrate Korea’s proud and cherished 5,0000 year history. We pray God will make Korea and Young Nak stronger in Christ. It is a Christian virtue to pray for stronger Korean nation coupled with crowded churches. Currently Young Nak church is holding a church conference entitled Remnant 2500. The purpose of this conference is to attract 2,500 new converts to Christ by the end of this year. So let’s go out and do our part: become a witness for Christ to strengthen the foundation of this church. Witnessing about Christ to friends and close associates is similar to construction work. When we introduce Christ to a new convert, we are building new foundations. We teach about a new way of living. A new way of thinking. For the first time a new convert can experience real love, heart-felt joy, deep and inner peace, tender patience, radiating with kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. These are just a few of the important changes Christians experience when they adopt Christ in the center of their life. Evangelizing is similar to building up a house build on rock. Going out to witness will strengthen faith. Faith is the foundation of Christian life. If faith is acted upon, you see hearts and minds transformed. You see the power of Christ. Evangelists’ build on the experience of going out in the field will produce fruits. Confidence increases. Love sways decision to continue to go out every week. The Lord can do amazing things when you allow him to be your mouthpiece. Evangelizing both seamen and factory workers every week is the cornerstone of the purpose of this English ministry. We are finding and building up new lives in Christ. These last few months we have been amazed to see many fruits in this church developing and growing. I strongly believe the Holy Spirit is working in the lives of this congregation since we are becoming a community of prayer warriors. Our numbers seem to be increasing every week … just like the number of buildings under construction keeps increasing every year in Korea. I have always been amazed to see so many new buildings built in a short time in Korea. Everywhere you look, open spaces are filled up with new office buildings or apartments. The construction of a building from beginning to end seems to me overwhelmingly daunting. The amount of planning, from architect’s drawings to detailed construction plans, seemed endless. Step by step, a plan is made followed meticulously until it comes to completion. One of the most impressive things I learned about the construction of Young Nak Church at the beginning of the Korean War was not only that this church is held up by over 1,000 wooden piles driven down into the clay and swampy marsh, but also that was far more piles than anyone imagined would actually be necessary to hold up this building. The original builders were determined to have a strong foundation. Did you know that there are over 400 references in Scripture relating to building and construction, used as metaphors, examples, in parables? “Unless the Lord builds the house,” one Psalm says, “those who build it labor in vain.” There is a “time to build,” Ecclesiastes says. “We have a building from God,” Paul says, “a house not made with human hands.” The church was called “the household of God.” In our gospel lesson Jesus is completing his Sermon on the Mount, full of teaching about what it takes to build a sturdy, good life. And he tells the story of the wise man who built his house on rock, so that when the rains fell and the floods came, and the winds blew, it didn’t fall down. We are all involved, he is saying, in building our lives, stone by stone, brick by brick, board by board. Every experience we have, every good thing, every mistake, every wound we receive, all of that goes into the shaping of our souls. Some of us start off with a lot of help getting our foundations in place. But plenty of us get off to shaky starts ― bad advice, no support, a lot that we have to overcome. However we start, though, we build our lives day by day. We make decisions, stone by stone, board by board. Good things happen. Someone helps us pay for college, or helps us get a job. Or we make mistakes, make foolish choices, get involved with ungodly people. I remember a spiritual mentor saying something to me that changed the way I had looked at the wrong turns in my own life. God, he said, is frugal. God doesn’t waste anything in our lives. Even the wrong turns, the bad mistakes, the wounds we get hit with ― God finds ways for us to learn from them, to grow through them, and even to use that experience to teach us what we couldn’t have learned any other way. Sometimes people lay out plans for their lives they later wish they hadn’t. I have heard more people than I can count say to me in one form or another, “I wish I hadn’t been so obsessed with work.” When I was looking to buy my first home, I inquired why did the owners want to sale this beautiful home? The real estate agent told me, “The owners were experiencing a marriage crisis. Both husband and wife worked hard and constantly to built this home. Finally, when the home was finally finished, their marriage was on the brink.” Later the wife applied for a divorce. The house stood empty. At some point along the way we may discover that the building plan we have been working with will never get us what we really want. Are we laying the right foundation in our Christian life? Jesus tells the story about the man who built wisely, but he also talks about the unwise man who built his house on sand, and so when the rains came, and the rivers rose, his house was destroyed. “Everyone who hears these words of mine and does not act on them will be like a foolish man who built his house on sand.” Do you remember the sense of disorientation so many felt after Hurricane Katrina? It felt as if the rains and winds and floods had come. Our “houses” were being attacked. Churches were also flooded with people looking for something firmer –something that would last forever. Where was the foundation that could hold against the storm? We have a foundation. “Christ is the cornerstone” of our building, Scripture says. There actually is a rock we can build on that cannot be shaken, and that rock is God, the Creator, and Christ, the one who comes to save and promises that none of us has to be lost. But it’s not enough just to know that. We have to build our lives on it. In his Sermon on the Mount Jesus says to turn the other cheek, to be the light of the world, to forgive, to be faithful in marriage, to refuse to give back violence for violence, and above all to trust. Trust that the Holy One knows every hair on your head. Trust that you cannot ever fall so far as to fall out of God’s hands. Build your life on that, and you will have a sure foundation. Let go of the past; it’s history. Don’t worry about the future; you have no control over it. Live right now. Trustingly, honestly, riskily, lovingly. And learning to live this way is like learning a craft, a craft such as, say, bricklaying. You don’t just walk out one day and skillfully shape and arrange and secure brick. It takes apprenticeship and practice and patience learning the skills. Being a great administrator, or basketball player, or dentist takes meticulous, painstaking learning and practice. And it needs to be a daily process of putting a God-consciousness into our days. The peace we experience by reading our bible and praying every day is something that we cannot get anywhere else in the world no matter how long we search for happiness ― a foundation for our lives, the rock that can sustain us for the rest of our days. When we commit our lives to glorifying our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, we are saying that there is a Power greater than life itself who us, and will go forth as we build our life on a foundation made of rock. So let’s apply today’s sermon into our hearts. Here how: 1. Know we all need a firm foundation. But it takes time and energy to build it. 2. Learning the essential pieces of the faith so that you can lay down those foundations for our faith is essential. Trust God always- 100% of the time. Learn from the people in the bible who have found God trustworthy. 3. Learn to give and receive Christ’s love even if you hardly know who Christ is. How? A. Reading a book in the bible will help you experience God’s love. (I suggest staring with the easiest book in the bible first, Psalms). B. Read consistently. Make a goal of reading one or two chapters a day. There might be some verses which are unclear. Write them down. Come to church on Sunday. Ask someone who you trust to answer your question correctly. C. Never forget to pray every day. Prayer will deepen faith, listening to what God is saying, reaching out to someone else’s need ― all that is building a foundation, so that when the storms and winds and floods come, you’re ready. So when the storms come, and they will, isn’t that the attitude you would like to have ― would like to have ― a strong, sure foundation? Well, we can. Just build it, step-step, day-by-day, one brick at a time. Amen. Young Nak Church
A Letter to Bill William D. Hyatt from Ray Stedman(William D. Hyatt에게 보낸 Ray Stedman의 편지)/ Acts 6:2-4(행6:2-4)/ 1990-12-29
A Letter to Bill William D. Hyatt from Ray Stedman(William D. Hyatt에게 보낸 Ray Stedman의 편지) Acts 6:2-4(행6:2-4) A Letter to William D. Hyatt from Ray Stedman December 29, 1990 Dear Bill, First, congratulations to you and Yvonne for 25 years together. It is always great to see couples demonstrating marriage fidelity in these days of quickie marriages and even quicker divorces! As you know, Hawaii is very important to Elaine and me as we began our marriage there 45 years ago last October! We are pleased to hear that you enjoyed your time there. I apologize for some delay in getting this letter back to you, but I was given a heavy assignment in writing by Intervarsity Press and was asked to get a manuscript back to them by Christmas. That meant writing-for 6-7 hours a day in the intervening time, hence my delay. It was encouraging to me, however, to note your concern for the [PBC] South eldership. You are quite right that some remedial action needs to be taken immediately to get the elders back on the track of biblical eldering. You ask: How do elders actually come to understand where the Lord of the church is leading it? The answer is basically threefold: 1. By accepting the fact that this is their primary role! This is the way they are to use their time. They cannot use the excuse that they have no time for the methods that make this possible, for this is their major responsibility, given by the Lord himself. Jesus is present at PBC South and is active in doing exactly what he said he would do: to open doors for ministering by the people, and close other doors (Cf. Rev 3:7-6). He has revealed to his apostles how he plans to make those open doors known---by speaking to and through elders (Titus 15, Acts 20:26-29). 2. Further, his instrument for making known his mind is the Word of God taught by the Spirit of God. Elders must be constantly studying the Word and discussing it together: It Is not enough to assume the knowledge they have gained in the past is sufficient. Light must spring forth from the Word continually. This studying is to be done individually, by twos and threes, and corporately at meetings of the elders together When various issues come before them they are to ask: what principles from Scripture bear upon this problem? If they haven’t time for this then they haven’t time to be elders at all, and ought to resign! To have the time for this they are to deliberately refuse to get involved in solving what you call “practical” problems, the nuts & bolts of running a church. This is clearly the point of Acts 6:2-4: decisions about maintenance problems, building expansions, painting, carpentering, organizing an office, etc., etc., must be passed along to deacons (both male and female) who are qualified by knowledge to deal with such matters If elders allow themselves to get tangled up with such they are being unfaithful to the task for which the Lord called them! Furthermore, what they learn in their studying, they are to teach to others---this is what Acts 6:4 calls “the ministry of the word” which elders are to give their attention to. This teaching is directed toward preparing others to be elders, or preparing them to teach in Sunday School or home Bible classes, or to minister from the pulpit, or in evangelistic outreaches. The elders are obviously to the local church what the apostles were to the church at large. They have the ministry of apostleship, carried on at a local level. 3. With this goes the ministry of prayer (Acts. 6:4 again). This, too, is an individual ministry and a collective one. Together they are to pray for wisdom in making decisions, for clarity in understanding Scripture, for harmony in their meetings and in the church, for healing for those who are sick, for vitality in worship, for courage to discipline biblically for power to be manifested in the ministry of the saints. Again, if they haven’t time for this then they haven’t time to be elders at all. They must not allow anyone to take this ministry of the word and prayer away from them for it is given to them by their Lord and it is to him they must give on account of their stewardship (Heb. 13:17). So I urge you to share this letter with the brothers there and take the steps which the Lord will indicate by bringing about unanimous agreement to remedy this faulty situation. The church will never be stronger than its leadership, but if the leadership is faithful the Lord will do great things among them. Give my loving greetings to all. Most Cordially. Pastor Ray C. Stedman
A Lunch box of a boy(소년의 도시락)/ John 6:1-15(요6:1-15 )/ 어린이주일학교영어설교/ 영한대역설교/ 2009-09-27
A Lunch box of a boy(소년의 도시락) John 6:1-15(요6:1-15) A Lunch box of a boy John 6:1-15 There was a boy. This boy’s name is not recorded in bible. Would you give him a nice name? O. K. Let’s call him Terry. He must be as tall as @@ (pointing one of students). His hair must be as short as ##‘s hair. He must be as active as **. One day, Terry was running an errand. He was carrying a box. It is a package his mother wanted to give to his uncle. Terry had another box. It’s the lunch box his mother made for him. It was his favorite lunch box - two fish and five loaves of bread. ◎ Speaking & Activities1 말하기 & 활동1 준비물: 도시락 크기의 종이박스와 그 안에 오려 넣은 오병이어 그림 또는 실물 Here is Terry’s lunch box. What are in this box? (two fish and five loaves of bread) Let’s see they are in here. Let’s count them. (어린이들과 함께 센다) One, two - two fish. One, two, three, four, five - five loaves of bread...two fish and five loaves of bread. Terry walked and walked until he saw a great crowd at the foot of a mountain. Terry thought, “There must be something fun. I will take a look at it.” and went close to the crowd. Jesus was teaching people bible stories. People loved to hear Jesus teaching because it made them happy. People wanted to learn more and more about God and they didn’t want to go home. It passed lunch time. Jesus said to his disciples, “It is lunch time. Where can we give them something to eat?” Philip counted money and answered, “We don’t have enough money, sir.” Jacob looked around and answered, “We don’t see any restaurant ... even Mcdonald or Burger King near around.” Thomas yawned and answered, “How about sending them back home?” Nobody came up with a great answer. At that time, Andrew came with Terry, the little boy. Andrew said, “This boy said he had something to share with us ◎ Speaking & Activities2 말하기 & 활동2 준비물: 4명의 제자 이름을 적은 흰 종이 The four disciples of Jesus are here. We will have them come up here. Four disciples, come forward, please. Here they are. But I won’t tell you their names. They will say what they said to Jesus. Then you will tell me each disciple’s name. Philip counted money and answered, “We don’t have enough money, sir.” Who is this man? James looked around and answered, “We don’t see any restaurant ... even Mcdonald or Burger King near around.” Thomas yawned and answered, “How about sending them back home?” Nobody came up with a great answer. Finally Andrew came with Terry, the little boy. Andrew said, “This boy said he had something to share.” “What is that?” asked Jesus. “Jesus, you said God’s people should share. I have my lunch box. I want to share it with people.” “How many people can eat it?” asked disciples opening up the lunch box. “Only two fish and five loaves of bread?” said disappointed disciples “They are yummy. And Jesus can do anything with it. Don’t you believe?” said Terry. Jesus took the two fish and five loaves of bread. He held them up high in heaven and prayed. “Thanks, Father for this meal and this boy’s faith.” Then, he had the food passed out. The food in the box was passed out until 5,000 people were fed. “This is a miracle!” “You must be God’s Son.” People shouted in joy. “I told you so. I knew He could do it,” Terry smiled. Dear friends, we are here in Jesus’ presence. in the house of God. Anything can happen if we are willing to share, willing to give to Jesus what we have, even though they are very small pieces. And we also can give him our faith. Then Jesus will take them and bless them and the next thing that will happen will be blessings abundant over on Gupo and Busan and all over the world. 소년의 도시락 요6:1-15 한 소년이 있었어요. 이 소년의 이름이 무엇이었는지 성경에 기록되어있지 않아요. 그에게 좋은 이름을 붙여주어 볼까요? (학생들로부터 이름 추천을 받는다) 좋아요. 그를 테리라고 부릅시다. 그는 oo (참석 학생 중에 한 사람을 가리키며) 만큼 키가 커요. 그의 머리칼은 ## 만큼 짧아요. 그는 ** 만큼 활동적이에요. 어느 날 테리는 심부름을 하고 있었어요. 그는 짐을 들고 가고 있었는데, 그것은 그의 어머니가 그의 삼촌에게 전해 주시기를 원하는 물건이었어요. 테리는 또 다른 박스도 갖고 있었는데 그것은 그의 어머니가 그를 위해 만들어주신 점심 도시락이었어요. 그것은 그가 가장 좋아하는 점심이었어요. 두 마리 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵이었어요. ◎ 말하기 & 활동 1 여기에 테리의 점심 도시락이 있어요. 이 안에 무엇이 있을까요? (두 마리 생선과 다섯 덩이의 빵) 이 안에 그것들이 있는지 봅시다. 한번 세어 봅시다. 하나, 둘 - 두 마리의 생선. 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯 - 다섯 덩이의 빵 ... 두 마리의 생선과 다섯 덩이의 빵. 테리는 걷고 걷다가 산기슭에 엄청나게 많은 사람들이 모여 있는 것을 보았어요. 테리는 생각했죠, “뭔가 재미있는 게 있나봐. 가서 봐야겠어.” 그리고 군중들이 모인 곳으로 가까이 갔어요. 사실 예수님이 사람들에게 성경 이야기를 가르쳐 주고 계셨어요. 사람들은 예수님의 가르침을 좋아했어요. 왜냐하면 예수님의 가르침이 사람들을 기쁘게 해 주니까요. 사람들은 하나님에 관해서 더 많이 배우기를 원했고, 그들은 집에 가기를 원치 않았어요. 점심시간이 지났어요. 예수님은 제자들에게 말씀하셨어요. “점심시간이구나. 어디서 먹을 것을 구할 수 있을까?” 필립이 돈을 세어보고 대답하기를, “우리는 충분한 돈이 없어요, 주님.” 야곱이 둘러보고 대답하기를 “여긴 식당이 없어요. 이 근처엔 맥도날드도 버거킹도 없어요.” 토마스가 하품을 하며 대답하길, “사람들을 집으로 돌려보내는 것이 어떻겠어요?” 아무도 좋은 대답을 하지 못했어요. 마침내 안드레가 어린소년 테리를 데리고 왔어요. 안드레가 말하기를, “이 애가 나누어 (먹을) 것이 있답니다.” ◎ 말하기 & 활동 2 여기 예수님의 네 명의 제자들이 있어요. 그들을 불러 이 앞에 나와 보게 합시다. 네 명의 제자들, 앞으로 나와 보세요. 여기 나왔네요. 그러나 나는 그들의 이름을 말하지 않을 거예요. 그들은 예수님께 자기들이 한 말을 할 거에요. 그러면 여러분은 각 사람의 이름이 무엇인지 맞춰보세요. ☐☐이 돈을 세어보고 대답하기를, “우리는 충분한 돈이 없어요, 주님.” 이 사람은 누구일까요? ☐☐이 둘러보고 대답하기를 “여긴 식당이 없어요. 이 근처엔 맥도날드도 버거킹도 없어요.” 이 사람은 누구일까요? ☐☐☐가 하품을 하며 대답하길, “사람들을 집으로 돌려보내는 것이 어떻겠어요?” 아무도 좋은 대답을 하지 못했어요. 이 사람은 누구일까요? ☐☐☐가 말하기를, “이 애가 나누어 (먹을) 것이 있답니다.” 이 사람은 누구일까요? “그게 무어냐?” 예수님이 물으셨습니다. “예수님, 예수님이 하나님의 사람들은 나누어야 한다고 하셨어요. 제게 점심 도시락이 있어요. 이걸 사람들과 나눠 먹고 싶어요.” 그들은 “얼마나 많은 사람이 먹을 수 있을까?” 제자들은 도시락을 열면서 생각했어요. “두 마리 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵뿐이야?” 제자들이 실망하여 말했어요. “그것들은 참 맛있어요. 그리고 예수님께서 이것으로 무엇이든 하실 수 있다고 믿지 않으세요? 테리가 대답하였어요. 예수님은 두 마리의 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵을 손에 들었어요. 그것들을 하늘로 높이 들어 올리시고 기도했어요. “감사합니다, 아버지. 이 음식과 소년의 믿음으로 인하여 감사드립니다. 그런 다음에 주님은 음식을 나누어 돌리기 시작하셨어요. 도시락안의 음식은 돌려지고 돌려졌어요. 오천 명이 먹을 때까지 그치지 않고 나누어 졌어요. “이것은 기적이다!” “당신은 하나님의 아들이심에 틀림없군요!” 사람들은 기뻐하며 외쳤습니다. “그것 봐요. 내가 말했잖아요. 나는 저 분이 하실 수 있을 줄 알았다구요!” 테리는 미소 지었습니다. ◎ 질문 Q1. 무엇이 문제였는가요? (점심시간이었다. 그러나 그들은 먹을 것이 없었다.) Q2. 테리의 점심 도시락에는 무엇이 들어있었나요? (두 마리의 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵) Q3. 테리가 그의 점심 도시락을 예수님께 드릴 수 있었던 이유는 무엇인가요? (하나님의 사람은 나누어야 한다고 생각했다. 그리고 예수님은 그것을 가지고 무언가 놀라운 일을 하실 줄로 믿었다.)요 6:1-15 Pastor Seong-Ah Hong(홍성아 목사)(Busan Gupo Church(부산구포교회))
A Lunch box of a boy(소년의 도시락)/ John 6:1-15(요6:1-15 )/ 어린이주일학교영어설교/ 영한대역설교/ 2009-09-27
A Lunch box of a boy(소년의 도시락) John 6:1-15(요6:1-15) A Lunch box of a boy John 6:1-15 There was a boy. This boy’s name is not recorded in bible. Would you give him a nice name? O. K. Let’s call him Terry. He must be as tall as @@ (pointing one of students). His hair must be as short as ##‘s hair. He must be as active as **. One day, Terry was running an errand. He was carrying a box. It is a package his mother wanted to give to his uncle. Terry had another box. It’s the lunch box his mother made for him. It was his favorite lunch box - two fish and five loaves of bread. ◎ Speaking & Activities1 말하기 & 활동1 준비물: 도시락 크기의 종이박스와 그 안에 오려 넣은 오병이어 그림 또는 실물 Here is Terry’s lunch box. What are in this box? (two fish and five loaves of bread) Let’s see they are in here. Let’s count them. (어린이들과 함께 센다) One, two - two fish. One, two, three, four, five - five loaves of bread...two fish and five loaves of bread. Terry walked and walked until he saw a great crowd at the foot of a mountain. Terry thought, “There must be something fun. I will take a look at it.” and went close to the crowd. Jesus was teaching people bible stories. People loved to hear Jesus teaching because it made them happy. People wanted to learn more and more about God and they didn’t want to go home. It passed lunch time. Jesus said to his disciples, “It is lunch time. Where can we give them something to eat?” Philip counted money and answered, “We don’t have enough money, sir.” Jacob looked around and answered, “We don’t see any restaurant ... even Mcdonald or Burger King near around.” Thomas yawned and answered, “How about sending them back home?” Nobody came up with a great answer. At that time, Andrew came with Terry, the little boy. Andrew said, “This boy said he had something to share with us ◎ Speaking & Activities2 말하기 & 활동2 준비물: 4명의 제자 이름을 적은 흰 종이 The four disciples of Jesus are here. We will have them come up here. Four disciples, come forward, please. Here they are. But I won’t tell you their names. They will say what they said to Jesus. Then you will tell me each disciple’s name. Philip counted money and answered, “We don’t have enough money, sir.” Who is this man? James looked around and answered, “We don’t see any restaurant ... even Mcdonald or Burger King near around.” Thomas yawned and answered, “How about sending them back home?” Nobody came up with a great answer. Finally Andrew came with Terry, the little boy. Andrew said, “This boy said he had something to share.” “What is that?” asked Jesus. “Jesus, you said God’s people should share. I have my lunch box. I want to share it with people.” “How many people can eat it?” asked disciples opening up the lunch box. “Only two fish and five loaves of bread?” said disappointed disciples “They are yummy. And Jesus can do anything with it. Don’t you believe?” said Terry. Jesus took the two fish and five loaves of bread. He held them up high in heaven and prayed. “Thanks, Father for this meal and this boy’s faith.” Then, he had the food passed out. The food in the box was passed out until 5,000 people were fed. “This is a miracle!” “You must be God’s Son.” People shouted in joy. “I told you so. I knew He could do it,” Terry smiled. Dear friends, we are here in Jesus’ presence. in the house of God. Anything can happen if we are willing to share, willing to give to Jesus what we have, even though they are very small pieces. And we also can give him our faith. Then Jesus will take them and bless them and the next thing that will happen will be blessings abundant over on Gupo and Busan and all over the world. 소년의 도시락 요6:1-15 한 소년이 있었어요. 이 소년의 이름이 무엇이었는지 성경에 기록되어있지 않아요. 그에게 좋은 이름을 붙여주어 볼까요? (학생들로부터 이름 추천을 받는다) 좋아요. 그를 테리라고 부릅시다. 그는 oo (참석 학생 중에 한 사람을 가리키며) 만큼 키가 커요. 그의 머리칼은 ## 만큼 짧아요. 그는 ** 만큼 활동적이에요. 어느 날 테리는 심부름을 하고 있었어요. 그는 짐을 들고 가고 있었는데, 그것은 그의 어머니가 그의 삼촌에게 전해 주시기를 원하는 물건이었어요. 테리는 또 다른 박스도 갖고 있었는데 그것은 그의 어머니가 그를 위해 만들어주신 점심 도시락이었어요. 그것은 그가 가장 좋아하는 점심이었어요. 두 마리 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵이었어요. ◎ 말하기 & 활동 1 여기에 테리의 점심 도시락이 있어요. 이 안에 무엇이 있을까요? (두 마리 생선과 다섯 덩이의 빵) 이 안에 그것들이 있는지 봅시다. 한번 세어 봅시다. 하나, 둘 - 두 마리의 생선. 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯 - 다섯 덩이의 빵 ... 두 마리의 생선과 다섯 덩이의 빵. 테리는 걷고 걷다가 산기슭에 엄청나게 많은 사람들이 모여 있는 것을 보았어요. 테리는 생각했죠, “뭔가 재미있는 게 있나봐. 가서 봐야겠어.” 그리고 군중들이 모인 곳으로 가까이 갔어요. 사실 예수님이 사람들에게 성경 이야기를 가르쳐 주고 계셨어요. 사람들은 예수님의 가르침을 좋아했어요. 왜냐하면 예수님의 가르침이 사람들을 기쁘게 해 주니까요. 사람들은 하나님에 관해서 더 많이 배우기를 원했고, 그들은 집에 가기를 원치 않았어요. 점심시간이 지났어요. 예수님은 제자들에게 말씀하셨어요. “점심시간이구나. 어디서 먹을 것을 구할 수 있을까?” 필립이 돈을 세어보고 대답하기를, “우리는 충분한 돈이 없어요, 주님.” 야곱이 둘러보고 대답하기를 “여긴 식당이 없어요. 이 근처엔 맥도날드도 버거킹도 없어요.” 토마스가 하품을 하며 대답하길, “사람들을 집으로 돌려보내는 것이 어떻겠어요?” 아무도 좋은 대답을 하지 못했어요. 마침내 안드레가 어린소년 테리를 데리고 왔어요. 안드레가 말하기를, “이 애가 나누어 (먹을) 것이 있답니다.” ◎ 말하기 & 활동 2 여기 예수님의 네 명의 제자들이 있어요. 그들을 불러 이 앞에 나와 보게 합시다. 네 명의 제자들, 앞으로 나와 보세요. 여기 나왔네요. 그러나 나는 그들의 이름을 말하지 않을 거예요. 그들은 예수님께 자기들이 한 말을 할 거에요. 그러면 여러분은 각 사람의 이름이 무엇인지 맞춰보세요. ☐☐이 돈을 세어보고 대답하기를, “우리는 충분한 돈이 없어요, 주님.” 이 사람은 누구일까요? ☐☐이 둘러보고 대답하기를 “여긴 식당이 없어요. 이 근처엔 맥도날드도 버거킹도 없어요.” 이 사람은 누구일까요? ☐☐☐가 하품을 하며 대답하길, “사람들을 집으로 돌려보내는 것이 어떻겠어요?” 아무도 좋은 대답을 하지 못했어요. 이 사람은 누구일까요? ☐☐☐가 말하기를, “이 애가 나누어 (먹을) 것이 있답니다.” 이 사람은 누구일까요? “그게 무어냐?” 예수님이 물으셨습니다. “예수님, 예수님이 하나님의 사람들은 나누어야 한다고 하셨어요. 제게 점심 도시락이 있어요. 이걸 사람들과 나눠 먹고 싶어요.” 그들은 “얼마나 많은 사람이 먹을 수 있을까?” 제자들은 도시락을 열면서 생각했어요. “두 마리 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵뿐이야?” 제자들이 실망하여 말했어요. “그것들은 참 맛있어요. 그리고 예수님께서 이것으로 무엇이든 하실 수 있다고 믿지 않으세요? 테리가 대답하였어요. 예수님은 두 마리의 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵을 손에 들었어요. 그것들을 하늘로 높이 들어 올리시고 기도했어요. “감사합니다, 아버지. 이 음식과 소년의 믿음으로 인하여 감사드립니다. 그런 다음에 주님은 음식을 나누어 돌리기 시작하셨어요. 도시락안의 음식은 돌려지고 돌려졌어요. 오천 명이 먹을 때까지 그치지 않고 나누어 졌어요. “이것은 기적이다!” “당신은 하나님의 아들이심에 틀림없군요!” 사람들은 기뻐하며 외쳤습니다. “그것 봐요. 내가 말했잖아요. 나는 저 분이 하실 수 있을 줄 알았다구요!” 테리는 미소 지었습니다. ◎ 질문 Q1. 무엇이 문제였는가요? (점심시간이었다. 그러나 그들은 먹을 것이 없었다.) Q2. 테리의 점심 도시락에는 무엇이 들어있었나요? (두 마리의 생선과 다섯 조각의 빵) Q3. 테리가 그의 점심 도시락을 예수님께 드릴 수 있었던 이유는 무엇인가요? (하나님의 사람은 나누어야 한다고 생각했다. 그리고 예수님은 그것을 가지고 무언가 놀라운 일을 하실 줄로 믿었다.)요 6:1-15 Pastor Seong-Ah Hong(홍성아 목사)(Busan Gupo Church(부산구포교회))
A man who eats the bread of life(생명의 떡을 먹는 사람)/ John 6:48-58(요6:48-58)/ 2003-06-11
A man who eats the bread of life(생명의 떡을 먹는 사람) John 6:48–58(요6:48-58) A man who eats the bread of life John 6:48–58 A man takes a food to keep his life and works to feed the food to his body. All alive that had eaten bread were dead. While, Jesus spoke of the bread of life personally which whoever eat it never is dead. “I am that bread of life. Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead. – I am the living bread which came down from heaven: If any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will for the life of the world.” All foods that we have taken are perished and everyone that had eaten the food was dead. So Jesus said of it, “labor not for the meat which perishes, but for that meat which endures into everlasting life, which the son of man shall give into you. What is the bread of life that not perishes or not dead and how can we obtain it? 1. Jesus is the bread of life and that we eat the bread means that we believe in him. Jesus has come as the bread of life. He has come down from the Heaven to become a bread of life or a food for us, such as to crucify himself on the cross for us. The passage of 53 –55 in this paragraph says, “then. Jesus said into them, verily, verily, I say into you, except you eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoso eats my flesh, and drinks my blood, has eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. That we eat Jesus flesh, and drinks his blood means that we must believe in Jesus. Such as, that eating his flesh means that by our spirit, we believe in the fact that Jesus is the Son of God who is living and that his body was offered for us. That drinking us his blood means that we believe in the fact by spirit that he paid the worthy of our sin as shed his blood on the cross. That eating his flesh is the same behavior as that drinking his blood. As obtaining the life by eating a food, we may obtain the everlasting life as receiving him. 2. Jesus’ flesh is the true food for us and is the true drink his blood for us. “For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed (55).” Jesus is the true food and true drink for everyone regardless of sex, old and young, or poor and rich. Whosoever believes in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. This food is not an amount that we take for only a day but have to eat it we day by day. Without missing, we should eat it as believing in him. As eating it, it may become the true food within me. Also the family member each may live as believing Jesus. I hope that family all would live, eating and drinking of Jesus who is the true food and drink for us. 3. He who eats the bread of life lives, communicating with God. “He that eats my flesh, and drinks my blood, dwells in me, and I in him (56).” Dwelling in Jesus means that we live within him. If the bread of life of Jesus enters within me, we may communicate with Jesus and by his power, our soul is revived. The happiness of Jesus’ believer depends on communicating with him. Therefore, he that eats the bread of life may live satisfactorily, always communicating with Lord (John6: 35) 4. He that eats the bread of life lives by the grace of God (57). “As the living Father has sent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eats me, even he shall live by me (57).” He that eats the Christ will be changed into his physical constitutes and come to resembling his personality into the configuration of Christ and make live as him. This is the living by Christ. If you ate the bread of life of Christ, his power shall come out of from you. Like this, he that eats the bread of life can praise under the trouble and persecution and even while he is dying, his face is radiant like an angel. This is because he lives, eating the bread of life by his grace. 5. He that eats the bread of life shall live forever and shall become a food to others. “This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your father did eat manna, and are dead: he that eats of this bread shall live forever (58).” We may live forever as eating Jesus the bread of life. Since Jesus saved us as becoming bread to us, we also must save other as becoming bread to them. Multitude men always followed him: since there was bread, a poor could eat the bread, a solitary man ate the comfort and fed courage to a discouragement, the health to sicknesses, the life to dead. Jesus was a friend to sinners and beings discarded. Dear everybody! Wherever you go, I hope that you would become a being who is able to feed eatable things to others. Only a man that bears the cross of Jesus can distribute the bread to others as being as bread to them. In this world, many are suffered from starvation: some of them thirst for real physical food, while there are filled fully with the beings to be fallen into hell’s fire forever without tasting a bread of life which is food of a spirit. Let us feed such men the bread of life and let us become ourselves bread over the starvations, thirsty, beings in rags, solitude, imprisoned, discarded and alienated. Let us eat the bread of life which makes us not dead forever and feed it to them to be saved. Pastor S. H. Park
Turn away mine eyes from beholding vanity; and quicken thou me in thy way(내 눈을 돌이켜 허탄한 것을 보지 말게 하시고 주의 길에서 나를 살아나게 하소서)/ Psalm 119:37(시119:37)/ Pastor Charles Spurgeon(찰스 스펄전 목사)/ 새벽기도회설교/ 1850-01-20
Turn away mine eyes from beholding vanity; and quicken thou me in thy way(내 눈을 돌이켜 허탄한 것을 보지 말게 하시고 주의 길에서 나를 살아나게 하소서) Psalm 119:37(시119:37) DAILY READINGS by Charles Spurgeon sunset Psalm 119:37 EVENING: January 20 There are divers kinds of vanity. The cap and bells of the fool, the mirth of the world, the dance, the lyre, and the cup of the dissolute, all these men know to be vanities; they wear upon their forefront their proper name and title. Far more treacherous are those equally vain things, the cares of this world and the deceitfulness of riches. A man may follow vanity as truly in the counting-house as in the theatre. If he be spending his life in amassing wealth, he passes his days in a vain show. Unless we follow Christ, and make our God the great object of life, we only differ in appearance from the most frivolous. It is clear that there is much need of the first prayer of our text. “Quicken thou me in thy way.” The Psalmist confesses that he is dull, heavy, lumpy, all but dead. Perhaps, dear reader, you feel the same. We are so sluggish that the best motives cannot quicken us, apart from the Lord himself. What! will not hell quicken me? Shall I think of sinners perishing, and yet not be awakened? Will not heaven quicken me? Can I think of the reward that awaiteth the righteous, and yet be cold? Will not death quicken me? Can I think of dying, and standing before my God, and yet be slothful in my Master’s service? Will not Christ’s love constrain me? Can I think of his dear wounds, can I sit at the foot of his cross, and not be stirred with fervency and zeal? It seems so! No mere consideration can quicken us to zeal, but God himself must do it, hence the cry, “Quicken thou me.” The Psalmist breathes out his whole soul in vehement pleadings: his body and his soul unite in prayer. “Turn away mine eyes,” says the body: “Quicken thou me,” cries the soul. This is a fit prayer for every day. O Lord, hear it in my case this night.